12 miles

This will be a longish post.

1 – So I finally bit the bullet and started blogging with Windows Live Writer. UM. WHAT TOOK ME SO LONG. If things look funky, let me know – I’m sure I’ll be obsessing about this for awhile, so just bear with me.

2 – Yesterday I was supposed to run my normal 3 miler with wear blue:Run to Remember. I laced up the shoes, threw on the Garmin, had Silly strapped into the stroller – couldn’t do it. I honestly, was just not feeling it. I think my issue is that I literally slept in until the last second. I’m turning into my husband – I have to be up for a bit, grab a little food, and ‘come around’ before I do anything productive. Honestly, I’m ok with missing the run. The Optimist had an amazing 3 miler, Kiddo and I played on the playground, and I mingled with other members. All good.

3 – 12 miles in the books this morning. I ran from “North Fort” to “Main Post” – I felt so cool exiting one gate and having to run through another, haha! I know that sounds so lame, but how many people can say they ran 12 miles on and off the same Army post! Winking smile As always, I REALLY suck at keeping my pace where it should be. I was telling myself that 9:40-10:00 minute miles is where I wanted to be. Yeah… my first mile was 9:45, and that’s the slowest I went; my last mile was at 9 flat. Whoops. The good news is that my knees didn’t really act up, and when they did, I made sure to stop and asses the situation. I’ll be heading in to see my amazing gait analysis lady and get her take on some stuff in regards to this pesky little issue.

my list of 12 soldiers

3a – The most challenging part of this run, was thinking of the soldiers I was running for. When I write out the ‘bio’s’, there is a somber feeling that comes over me. There’s sadness, but if anything, a quiet gratitude towards every one of them. With that said, I distinctly remember writing out ABM1 Roberts’ bio, and crying for a few minutes. The man loved his country, made the ultimate sacrifice, and was more than ok with it. I definitely suggest reading more about him; even though we might not all be affiliated with the military, we could all take something from ABM1 Roberts’ way of life.

4 – I’ve mentioned I love my life right? My amazing, studly, awesome husband woke up with the kiddo while I was out running. I come back home and have her flip out in happiness when I walked through the door. As I was rounding the corner onto my street, the puppies spotted me, and Shelby was literally running circles in excitement. The Optimist is currently napping while little one watches VeggieTales, as I sip on some coffee.

I apologize for the tiny font. This won’t happen again, and for some reason it just refuses to change. Today, I ran for the fallen military members:

Army Spc. Marc A. Anderson // January 30, 1972 – March 4, 2002
Spc. Anderson, 30, of Brandon, Florida was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, our of Fort Stewart, Georgia. Spc. Anderson was a standout athlete, even earning the 1995 Florida State Athlete of the Year award, being an All American in both football and track. From what I am reading, the world lost a pretty well rounded individual – he tutored students for free, and also volunteered with the Boys/Girls club. Upon his death, he left $12,000 to a former student to help pay off her student loans. Spc. Anderson was killed during a rescue mission during Operation Anaconda.

Army Pfc. Matthew A. Commons // February 18, 1981 – March 4, 2002
Pfc. Commons, 21, of Boulder City, Nevada was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment out of Fort Stewart, Georgia. Though he’s been gone almost 10 years, his in memoriam page still gets entries. While Pfc. Commons was young, he certainly had an impact on everyone he came in touch with, and it was clear that it was his dream was to become a Ranger. He was killed during a rescue mission during Operation Anaconda.

Navy Aviation Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Neil C. Roberts // August 16, 1969 – March 4, 2002
ABM1 Roberts, 32, of Woodland, California was assigned to SEAL Team 2, based out of Norfolk, Virginia. He was killed during rescue mission Operation Anaconda. There is a TON of information on ABM1 Roberts. To sum up his life correctly, I’m going to take an excerpt of a letter he wrote, only to be “opened in the event of his death” :: “I consider myself blessed with the best things a man could hope for. My childhood is something I’ll always treasure. My family is the reason I’m the person I am today. They supported and cared for me in the best way possible… The Navy, although I sacrificed personal freedom and many other things, I got just as much as I gave. My time in the Teams was special. For all the times I was cold, wet, tired, sore, scared, hungry and angry, I had a blast. The bad was balanced equally with the good… All the times spent in the company of my teammates was when I felt the closest to the men I had the privilege to work with. I loved being a SEAL. If I died doing something for the Teams, then I died doing what made me happy. Very few people have the luxury of that.” He left behind a wife and son.

Army Sgt. Philip J. Svitak // May 21, 1970 – March 4, 2002
Sgt Svitak, 31, of Joplin, Missouri, was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 160th Special Operations Regiment, out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. In addition to being a devoted husband and father, Sgt Svitak was also an avid cyclist, and there has been an annual
bike ride in his honor, held in his hometown of Joplin. He left behind his wife Laura, and sons Ethan and Nolan. He was killed during a rescue mission during Operation Anaconda.

Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Stanley L. Harriman // November 1, 1967 – March 2, 2002
CWO2 Harriman, 34, of Wade, North Carolina, was assigned to the 3rd Special Forces Group out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina. At first, his family was told that he was hit by enemy fire; a notion that the Army later changed to him being killed by friendly fire. He, and twin brother, Steve both entered the Army, mirroring their father’s military service. He was Operation Anaconda’s first casualty, leaving behind his wife Sheila, and their two children. CWO2 Harriman was killed on March 2, 2002, in Afghanistan.

To read more about Operation Anaconda, visit this link.

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Christopher M. Blaschum // October 20, 1966 – March 2, 2002
LCDR Blaschum, 33, of Port St. Joe, Florida was assigned to Fighter Squadron 143, Naval Air Station out of Oceana, Virginia. His father, a former Coast Guard Aviator, shares a memory – “the biggest memory I have, and the most fond, when … I was able to pin my wings, my original wings, on my son when he got his wings at commission, and that was indeed a proud moment for me.” LCDR Blaschum leaves behind his wife, Jodi, and sons Jackson and Max. His son, Jackson, has the following up on his MySpace page – “LCDR Chris Blaschum, USN RIP 03-02-02 I’ll miss you dad, you taught me how to be the best person I can be and nothing could make me more proud to be your son.” He was killed when he ejected from an F-14, due to a mechanical error, on a training flight over the Meditteranean.

Army Capt. Bartt D. Owens // October 17, 1971 – February 22, 2002
Capt. Owens, 31, of Middletown, Ohio was assigned to E Co, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. He graduated from the US Military Academy, and was looked up to by various cadets there. He leaves behind his wife, Leah, and their daughters Megan and Lauren. Megan wrote on his obituary site, “Bartt was a very amazing incridble man he was amazing loving and undescrible. He is my hero and also my father. I have a little memory of him but what I rember he was an amazing man”. He was killed with the MH-47E Chinook helicopter he was on, crashed at sea in the southern Philippines during a training exercise.

Army Staff Sgt. Bruce A. Rushforth Jr. // June 2, 1966 – February 22, 2002
Ssgt Rushforth, 35, of Middleboro, Massachusetts, was assigned to E Co, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Ssgt Rushforth held a Bachelors in Education, and was described as someone who always had a smile on his face. He is survived by his wife, Athena, and parents Bruce and Aurella. Ssgt Rushforth was killed when a MH-47E Chinook helicopter he was on, crashed at sea in the southern Philippines during a training exercise.

Army Maj. Curtis D. Feistner // November 7, 1967 – February 22, 2002
Maj. Feistner, 34, of White Bear Lake, Minnesota was assigned to E Co, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This highly decorated soldier was a graduate from the US Military Academy, and during his time in Hawaii he completed both the Honolulu Marathon and an Ironman. He lived life to the fullest, and while he has been gone for almost 10 years, eulogies and thoughts of remembrance still go up on his
West Point page. Maj. Curtis was killed when the MH-47E Chinook he was on, crashed at sea in the southern Philippines during a training exercise.

Army Staff Sgt. James P. Dorrity // May 12, 1964 – February 22, 2002
Ssgt Dorrity, 37, of Goldsboro North Carolina was assigned to E Co, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. From the get go, I learn that Ssgt Dorrity was looked up too, and a professional soldier through and through. Survived by his wife and two children, Ssgt Dorrity was full of life, and never gave an indication that what he was doing was dangerous. He was killed when a MH-47E Chinook helicopter he was on, crashed at sea in the southern Philippines during a training exercise.

Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Jody L. Egnor // October 20, 1969 – February 22, 2002
CW2 Egnor, 32, of Middletown, Ohio was assigned to E Co, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Enlisting in the Army upon graduating high school in 1988, he decided to go the Chief Warrant Officer route seven years later. This highly esteemed soldier is survived by his wife, Janet, and parents Roger and Margaret. CW2 Egnor was killed when a MH-47E Chinook helicopter he was on, crashed at sea in the southern Philippines during a training exercise.

Army Sgt. Jeremy D. Foshee // August 14, 1976 – February 22, 2002
Sgt. Foshee, 25, of Pisgah, Alabama was assigned to E Co, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, based out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Ensliting in the Army straight out of high school, Sgt. Foshee went on to have a decorated career.
Here
you can find a memorial page to this true Nightstalker, survived by his parents and brother. Sgt. Foshee was killed when a MH-47E Chinook helicopter he was on, crashed at sea in the southern Philippines during a training exercise.

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12 miles

One thought on “12 miles

  1. I have just come across your site and I am so moved by each of the wonderful servicemen and women that you write about and run in memory of. You truly are an inspiration, keep up the good work!

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